Einsight

The Scott Public Relations Healthcare, Insurance and Technology Public Relations Blog

Einsights

The Scott Public Relations Healthcare, Insurance and Technology Public Relations Blog

Tips on Selling to the C-Suite

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Many salespeople can find it challenging to get involved with executives who could potentially buy their product, often because the salesperson does not fully grasp the mentality an executive has towards their business and its process. We enjoyed the insights from Nicholas A.C. Read’s book, “Selling to the C-Suite,” which breaks down the data on how executives take part in the business process and helps readers understand the best ways to get executives involved to get the business they desire.

selling to the csuite_book imageRead reveals that 80% of executives are involved with purchasing decisions early on in the business cycle. As they move towards the middle of the cycle executives tend to delegate more tasks to subordinates, and at the end, the C-suite executives become involved once more to see if the initial vision can be delivered. This indicates the beginning of the cycle to be the prime time for getting involved with executives. However, recent findings infer that marketing may not be able to get you that meeting.

As executives inform themselves through the increasing use of the Internet, they search based on any problems that confront them. This creates a problem for marketers who use only the solution they offer in their SEO plan. Tailoring your presence to potential problems can get you in the eyes of the right executive much more easily and quickly.

Think about the most important goals or biggest potential problems the executives you want to work with can have, that your service or product can solve.

Making clear the value you can deliver to an organization is also essential when meeting with an executive. All communications must be value-driven to impact the C-suite mindset.

If you’re in healthcare, insurance, technology or other professional services industries, and need help with a PR, marketing or social media campaign, contact Scott Public Relations.

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Categories: Healthcare, Insights, Insurance, Public Relations and Marketing, Social Media, Technology

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Senior Citizens Explore Digital Technology for Health Management

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Any thought of digital technology catering exclusively to a young audience has now become a thing of the past. This is most true when dealing with the all-important topic of healthcare. With the aging population rapidly growing, senior citizens are looking at digital technology as a new way to help manage their health and well-being. According to a recent survey done by Accenture Health, 57% of senior citizens are turning towards the digital realm when it comes to handling their healthcare needs.

Although companies such as eCaring and VideoCare are marketing products that offer a direct social platform with caregivers, many seniors are interested in a simple online scheduling system that can instantly put them in touch with their doctors. Accenture states that only one-third of the nation’s healthcare providers currently offer this resource.

shutterstock_149565341_ehealthHere are some key findings from the report that pertain to senior citizens, their attitudes towards their health provider’s technological capabilities and the difficulties they face in accessing desired tools:

  • Two-thirds of seniors (67 percent) surveyed say that access to their health information is important, but only 28 percent currently have full access to their electronic health records.
  • Seventy percent of those surveyed believe it’s important to be able to request prescription refills electronically, but, fewer than half (46 percent) say they can do so today.
  • Fifty-eight percent want to be able to email healthcare providers, but only 15 percent say they currently have that capability.

“As the digitally engaged senior patient population continues to grow, healthcare systems need to consider the role the Internet can play in making healthcare more convenient for patients of all ages at every touch point,” said Jill Dailey, Accenture Health’s managing director of payer strategy.

If you’re in healthcare, insurance, technology or other professional services industries, and need help with a PR, marketing or social media campaign, contact Scott Public Relations.

Like what you’ve read? Follow Scott Public Relations on Facebook , Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Google+. For convenient blog updates, sign up for the Einsight RSS feed!

(Note: Many internet browser platforms are discontinuing their internal RSS reader. If you are viewing this in Google Chrome the RSS feed will not work properly since they discontinued Google Reader. If you have an independent reader set up already you should be fine. If you do not, may we suggest you look to Digg Reader, AOL Reader, or our personal favorite – Feedly to handle your RSS feeds. Happy reading.)

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How to Revamp Care in the Hospital and Healthcare Environment

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Is there an imbalance between your hospital’s daily operations and payment model? What your healthcare system achieves and how you get compensated are rapidly changing in today’s medical environment.

According to a recent report done by the American Hospital Association titled “Your Hospital’s Path to the Second Curve: Integration and Transformation,” hospitals are shifting from the ‘’first curve’’ of volume-centered care to a ‘’second curve’’ that expands upon value-based care models.  The report touches on the fact that this transition can be extremely difficult for healthcare leaders to carry out.

The AHA outlines 10 questions a health organization should consider before making this shift in care:

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  • What are the primary community health needs?
  • What are the long-term financial and clinical goals for this organization?
  • Would the organization be included in a health insurer’s narrow/preferred network, based on cost and quality outcomes?
  • Is there a healthy physician-hospital organization (or business model that aligns physician in private practice with hospitals and hospital-employed physicians)?
  • How much financial risk is the organization willing or able to take on?
  • What sustainable factors differentiate the organization from current and future competitors?
  • Are the organization’s data systems robust enough to provide actionable information for clinical decision making?
  • Does the organization have sufficient capital to test and implement new payment and care delivery models?
  • Does the organization have strong capabilities to deliver team-based, integrated care?
  • Is the organization proficient in program implementation and quality improvement?

The AHA’s report also highlights the pressures that are placed on hospitals, such as financial risk and heightened accountability. The AHA lists these five paths below for hospitals to use as a framework when beginning their transition:

  • Redefine to a different care delivery system. This can be achieved by a willingness to change towards a long-term care practice.
  • Partner with a care delivery system or health plan for greater horizontal or vertical reach, efficiency and resources for at-risk contracting. Hospitals should consider merging with another healthcare entity to create a strategic alliance and build multi-brand power.
  • Integrate by developing a health insurance function and/or services across the continuum of care. Create a long-lasting behavioral health, home health, post-acute, long-term or ambulatory care system for your hospital to thrive.
  • Experiment with new payment and care delivery models. Try out new payment models such as bundled payments and attempt to be more accountable with your delivery.
  • Specialize to become a high-performing and essential provider. Find a specialty medical service that your hospital can be known for, such as being a children’s hospital or rehabilitation center.

If you’re in healthcare, insurance, technology or other professional services industries, and need help with a PR, marketing or social media campaign, contact Scott Public Relations.

Like what you’ve read? Follow Scott Public Relations on Facebook , Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Google+. For convenient blog updates, sign up for the Einsight RSS feed!

(Note: Many internet browser platforms are discontinuing their internal RSS reader. If you are viewing this in Google Chrome the RSS feed will not work properly since they discontinued Google Reader. If you have an independent reader set up already you should be fine. If you do not, may we suggest you look to Digg Reader, AOL Reader, or our personal favorite – Feedly to handle your RSS feeds. Happy reading.)

Categories: Healthcare, Insights, Insurance, Public Relations and Marketing, Social Media, Technology

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,